Psychometry is a form of psychic reading in which the reader claims to obtain details about another through physical contact with their possessions.[20] Psychometry readers often ask the subject for their favorite and most meaningful objects, such as wedding rings, glasses, car keys, etc., for the reading. The belief is that objects which are in close proximity to a person for extended periods of time hold some of that person's 'energy'. This method has been used in attempts to locate missing persons.[21]

Spiritually, my higher guardians are channeling that the secrecy behind energy shield technology is to stop people fearing airline safety in the future. This is the spiritual vision of what the energy shield looks like: It is a triangular shape, high above the plane that sends strong vibration waves around the top and sides of the plane. There is no shield coming from the bottom of the plane. The invisible shield appears to be coming from space technology radiating at a different frequency, similar to satellite mechanics.
It would’ve been powerful, it would’ve been amazing; instead it just kind of flopped.  And even when they backed up later, you could see how that wouldn’t be as effective.  So, that’s one of the reasons that a prediction might not resonate with you is because the prediction that the psychic is getting and their information their getting is about the future, and they’re giving to you rather than just tell you what their seeing in their minds eye or feeling, they’re making an interpretation about it, and it’s wrong.  The message is usually correct, but rather than just give what they’re seeing or feeling, they’re making an interpretation about it.
In a 2016 article "The Hollywood Medium has a secret," Ryan Houlihan describes and analyses the Tyler Henry phenomenon from a skeptical perceptive. He explains how Tyler uses cold reading, and likely hot reading techniques as well, to give the illusion of psychic powers. Houlihan attributes Henry's success to the gullibility of celebrities as well as the media: "Henry's shtick is polished, but it only works because he has such great support. Besides the celebrities he interviews, Henry seems to have the full-throated endorsement of the entertainment press."[14] Houlihan concludes his article with:
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